Strawberries & A Summer Snack Pack…

Nothing says summer like a crate full of fresh strawberries in the fridge!  One of my favorite things to do in the summer is to go to a nearby strawberry field for hand-picked strawberries.  These sweet and tasty little treats are a far cry from the ginormous, waterlogged and tasteless strawberries sold in most grocery stores.  The boys love it when I come home with a bucket of berries and they love the goodies I make with them such as; strawberry smoothies, strawberry popsicles, strawberry fruit leather….lots of strawberry goodness.  But most of all, they love eating them straight out of the bucket which makes them a great “quick and easy” snack on hot summer days.

Speaking of snacks, at the beginning of the summer I knew I needed to find a solution to the snack situation.  The summer season is the busiest time of the year for me with my job and we also spend as much time as we can at our cabin.   Between my work and traveling to the cabin it is VERY easy to fall into the convenience trap when it came to snacks if I don’t plan ahead.  With the boys running in and out between bike rides, practices and friend’s houses and me immersed in work it’s easy to lose track of what the kids are eating on any given day.   So on busy days at home or when we’re up north at the cabin I’ve been putting together little snack packs in the morning.  These little packs are filled with a variety of snacks the boys can enjoy throughout the day.   When the boys need a little something between meals they know they can go to their snack pack and grab whatever they want and I don’t have to stop what I’m doing to get snacks ready.  The boys know the snack pack is their snack for the day so they don’t eat everything at once.  Typically they pick one thing out of their snack pack and leave the rest in the refrigerator.  When they come back for another snack they have whatever is left in their snack pack to choose from.  This has been a great system for us and the boys love having the variety to choose from when it’s snack time.

Here are a few pictures from our local strawberry field:

 

Today’s snack pack includes:  strawberries, a chocolate “Twinkie” (recipe below), Wisconsin cheese curds, carrots, energy bar (recipe below)

 

“Twinkie” (recipe from Maria)…you can click on her name and read some really interesting facts about this traditional kid’s snack:

1/4 cup coconut flour
1/4 tsp Celtic sea salt
1/2 tsp baking soda
3 eggs
1/3 cup Truvia (or erythritol and 1/2 tsp stevia glycerite)
1/2 TBS vanilla
1/4 cup butter or coconut oil
CHOCOLATE OPTION: add 3 TBS cocoa powder

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients and then start adding all the wet ingredients to the dry mix. Blend until it is light and fluffy. Grease the Twinkie pan (click HERE to purchase on amazon.com) (or cupcake pan if you don’t have a Twinkie pan). Pour the batter into the pan and fill 3/4 to the top. Bake for 11-12 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Remove from oven to cool completely.

Creamy Filling:
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/8 cup Truvia (or a few drops of stevia glycerite)

Whip the cream until light and fluffy, add in the sweetener.  Place the cream in a decorator tool or a ziplock bag with a hole cut into the corner and fill cakes in three areas along the bottom of the cake.

 

No-Bake Energy Bar (also from Maria)…again she has GREAT information about what makes these a great snack option:

1 cup raw sunflower seeds
1 cup raw pecans
4 TBS Coconut Oil
1/2 cup coconut flour
4 TBS Truvia or Erythritol
1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
2-4 TBS natural peanut butter
1 TBS vanilla extract
Dried, shredded unsweetened coconut

Chocolate Topping:

4 TBS coconut oil
8 TBS cocoa powder
2-3 TBS Truvia

Grind up 1 cup of sunflower seeds and the cup of pecans in food processor or coffee grinder and pour into bowl. Add coconut oil, coconut flour, sweetener, almond butter, vanilla flavoring, 1/2 cup sunflower seeds and mix all together. Pour into square casserole dish and press mixture down firmly.

Sauce:
In small saucepan, melt 4 tablespoons coconut oil and mix in cocoa and sweetener until thickened. Pour chocolate sauce on top and sprinkle with shredded coconut. Refrigerate for about 25-35 minutes. Cut up into squares and enjoy!

 

 

This entry was posted in General, snacks and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Strawberries & A Summer Snack Pack…

  1. Kate says:

    Why can’t real sugar be used? I don’t understand why the real stuff is bad, used in moderation. I see a lot of recipes using Truvia. If kids are active, a bit of sugar isn’t bad for them right?

    • Jamie says:

      That’s a great question, Kate! I’m not a health expert so my rationale comes only from the research I’ve done over the past year or two. We avoid white, refined sugar is because in order for it to be metabolized it must draw on the body’s reserve of vitamins and minerals. It also raises insulin levels which can depress our immune systems and consumed in excess it can lead to Type II diabetes. The American Heart Association reports that the average American child ages 6-8 consumes a whopping 21 teaspoons a day of sugar when it is recommended that they consume no more than 3-4 teaspoons a day. There is sugar and high fructose corn syrup hidden in so many foods these days that a child can easily consume the recommended 3 teaspoons a day just while eating breakfast. By cooking with plant based natural sweeteners such as truvia, erythritol, xylitol, etc… my kids still get to enjoy sweet treats without having nearly as much impact on their insulin levels and the plant based sweeteners don’t force their bodies to lose essential vitamins and minerals. We certainly do allow our kids an occasional treat…I wrote about that here: http://thislunchrox.com/2011/03/deprivation/ Our philosophy is that we really want our kids to look at sugary sweets as a treat for special occasions and not something we indulge in every day.

      • Mina says:

        Hi Jamie,

        I came across to your site while I was searching for coconut flour recipes for kids. Since I also make lunchbox for my daughter, I appreciate someone like you promoting kids’ healthy diet.

        But one thing I wanted to share with you is about this natural sweetner thing….not sure if you are aware that truvia for instance is not completely natural in a sence that it is still processed (and it was developed by CocaCola company). It’s known as a non-nutritive sweetener, and made of rebiana, erythritol (a sugar alcohol or polyol), and natural flavors….I also have the same stance as you do, I make some treats for my daughter but I always avoid whatver comes in the package. You know one of the ingredients above rebiana, if you google it wikipedia states that “rebiana is a Steviol glycoside which when used as a non-nutritive sweetener is 200 times sweeter than sugar.” Isn’t it scary?

  2. Dietary fructose is present primarily in sugar, high fructose corn syrup, honey, agave and fruit. Americans most frequently ingest fructose from sucrose (table sugar), which is 50% fructose and 50% glucose bonded together, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is about 55% fructose, honey is also 55% fructose. Agave, while ‘natural’ 90% fructose…NOT a health food! The average American in 1960 consumed 2 tsp of sugar/day. In 2011 it is over 65 tsp every day! Fructose consumption accounts for approximately 10.2% of total calories, EMPTY calories I might add. No wonder we have a problem with the rise in cancer, diabetes, liver disease, obesity…

    All sugars can be made into triglycerides, a form of body fat; however, once you start the process of fat synthesis from fructose, it’s hard to stop it.

    Our liver is like a ‘traffic cop’ that coordinates what we eat including sugars. It turns sugars into energy (if you are active), triglycerides, and cholesterol. Triglycerides are mainly formed in the liver. It is the liver’s job, when it encounters glucose, to decide whether the body needs to store the glucose as glycogen, burn it for energy or turn the glucose into triglycerides. Even if you are an athlete, burning sugar for energy is an inefficient and limiting source of energy. This is why marathon runners “Hit the Wall.” Your liver can only store 60-90 grams of carbs at a time. If you are an athlete and need more help on getting passed the ‘wall’ contact me for a consult on better energy sources!

    Fructose, on the other hand, enters this metabolic pathway downstream, bypassing the ‘traffic cop’ and flooding the metabolic pathway. It basically sneaks into the rock concert without a ticket. This ‘dumping of fructose’ contributes to lots of triglyceride synthesis. So, in the end fructose gets made into fat VERY easily! This also causes ‘fatty liver disease.’ I am seeing this problem in small children now, not because they are drinking alcohol…they are drinking massive amounts of juice! If you imagine our traditional culture, fruit is a seasonal summer food when we were most active. We didn’t have semi trucks shipping in oranges from other countries to a factory squeezing all the fructose out to form a sweet drink. Eating an orange is fine, but drinking 6 of them in a 8 ounce glass is too hard on our children’s liver. Different types of fruit have different levels of fructose too. Rhubarb is very low in fructose, where tropical fruits like bananas are very high (see the charts on fruits in all of my books).

    Here is an interesting fact… Welches 100% grape juice (NO SUGAR ADDED…just grape juice) has more sugar/fructose in 8 ounces than a 12 ounce can of Mountain Dew!

    Fructose also has no effect on our hormone Leptin, which tells us to stop eating AND interferes with Ghrelin, which is our hunger hormone.

  3. Dietary fructose is present primarily in sugar, high fructose corn syrup, honey, agave and fruit. Americans most frequently ingest fructose from sucrose (table sugar), which is 50% fructose and 50% glucose bonded together, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is about 55% fructose, honey is also 55% fructose. Agave, while ‘natural’ 90% fructose…NOT a health food! The average American in 1960 consumed 2 tsp of sugar/day. In 2011 it is over 65 tsp every day! Fructose consumption accounts for approximately 10.2% of total calories, EMPTY calories I might add. No wonder we have a problem with the rise in cancer, diabetes, liver disease, obesity…

    All sugars can be made into triglycerides, a form of body fat; however, once you start the process of fat synthesis from fructose, it’s hard to stop it.

    Our liver is like a ‘traffic cop’ that coordinates what we eat including sugars. It turns sugars into energy (if you are active), triglycerides, and cholesterol. Triglycerides are mainly formed in the liver. It is the liver’s job, when it encounters glucose, to decide whether the body needs to store the glucose as glycogen, burn it for energy or turn the glucose into triglycerides. Even if you are an athlete, burning sugar for energy is an inefficient and limiting source of energy. This is why marathon runners “Hit the Wall.” Your liver can only store 60-90 grams of carbs at a time. If you are an athlete and need more help on getting passed the ‘wall’ contact me for a consult on better energy sources!

    Fructose, on the other hand, enters this metabolic pathway downstream, bypassing the ‘traffic cop’ and flooding the metabolic pathway. It basically sneaks into the rock concert without a ticket. This ‘dumping of fructose’ contributes to lots of triglyceride synthesis. So, in the end fructose gets made into fat VERY easily! This also causes ‘fatty liver disease.’ I am seeing this problem in small children now, not because they are drinking alcohol…they are drinking massive amounts of juice! If you imagine our traditional culture, fruit is a seasonal summer food when we were most active. We didn’t have semi trucks shipping in oranges from other countries to a factory squeezing all the fructose out to form a sweet drink. Eating an orange is fine, but drinking 6 of them in a 8 ounce glass is too hard on our children’s liver. Different types of fruit have different levels of fructose too. Rhubarb is very low in fructose, where tropical fruits like bananas are very high.

    Here is an interesting fact… Welches 100% grape juice (NO SUGAR ADDED…just grape juice) has more sugar/fructose in 8 ounces than a 12 ounce can of Mountain Dew!

    Fructose also has no effect on our hormone Leptin, which tells us to stop eating AND interferes with Ghrelin, which is our hunger hormone.

  4. Marilyn says:

    Kate you are missing the point of the blog and that is to find substitutes for things with sugar in them! Sugar has a negative impact on how the body produces insulin. Those of us who are eating low carb and looking for recipes and foods that use natural sweetener that is NOT sugar.

  5. I’m sure lucky i always discovered this unique weblog, precisely an appropriate information i always was basically looking for the purpose of!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>